The garden could use your help.

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Spring break is right around the corner, a time for many to get away from campus, leaving us in a need of volunteers the week of March 24th-29th to water the fast growing plants at the Student Garden at Sunset Recreation Center. Mornings are best to water, though we would be appreciative for any time as long as it gets watered. *1-2 volunteers per day needed*. Water sufficiently, but avoid puddles! Please visit the sign up sheet or email Alyssa at aac1218@gmail.com if you are available and would like to volunteer. Email for any questions! Thank you!

Sign-Up Here  


Last day of garden lab

Here are a couple of pictures I took to document the new projects we started yesterday–building a picnic table, designing and building a pea-scaffold, shaping an abstract sculpture of long tines of wood into a trellis that will also coax the peas skyward, mulching to protect from the heat, and putting in some new plantings.

A tower of peas poised to grow.

A tower of peas poised to grow.

Tines of re-purposed wood provide a pitchfork-like frame for peas to grow.

Tines of re-purposed wood provide a pitchfork-like frame for peas to grow.

Here is a snap of the some of the yukkier denizens of our new ecosystem, aphids that have infested the cabbage.

Aphids preying on the bolting cabbage.

Aphids preying on the bolting cabbage.

The UC ag resources website has this to say about them. They are indeed specialists, and called cabbage aphids~

DESCRIPTION OF THE PEST

Cabbage aphids are green gray with a white, waxy coating. They commonly occur in dense colonies, often covered with waxy droplets. They prefer to feed on the youngest leaves and flowering parts and are often found deep within the heads of cabbages or Brussels sprouts. The aphid has a simple life cycle with adult females giving birth to live offspring throughout the year in most parts of California. Both winged and wingless adults occur; the winged adults have a black thorax and lack the waxy coating. The aphid does not infest noncruciferous crops but can survive on related weed species when cole crops are not in the field.

No doubt we will see more similar “pests,” as we continue to grow things. I think the cabbages were a bit vulnerable because they were stuck in their pots so long before they initially got planted and they got kind of weak overall. Also, since we are just starting to build up our soil and its microbial worlds with new compost, the soil is also kind of “new,” and probably not as hardy a nutrient as it will be even in a few weeks.

And lastly, a group-ish picture as things wind down for the day.

Relaxing around the new picnic table that you guys just built!

Relaxing around the new picnic table that you guys just built!


Feb 13th Garden Watering

I went to our garden late yesterday afternoon and found that the soil seemed drier than normal from the warm day, so I gave it the plants a hearty watering.  The lettuce and cabbage beds look green and luscious as always, and I tasted some of the green lettuce to find that it was slightly bitter but deliciously crunchy.  Many little green sprouts are starting to poke their heads out of the beds we planted earlier – can’t wait to see what they become!

Bed with radish and bok choy sprouts on the right, strawberries, lettuce and cabbage on the left

Bed with radish and bok choy sprouts on the right, strawberries, lettuce and cabbage on the left


Garden Update : Friday, January 31st

The garden is looking good!

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“I’m I big enough to be eaten yet?”

Upon arriving, I noticed that the plants had already been watered. So I took my time clearing away those prickly tree seed pod balls. I also ended up doing some additional watering for some fringe plants that needed some love.

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“I’m so happy and comfortable in my new home!”


UCLA Student Garden Before and After Pics

UCLA Student Garden Before and After Pics

Here’s a blog post documenting the progress of the garden thus far:

http://campusgardenatucla.blogspot.com/2013/01/documenting-progress-so-far-aka-before.html